Styling and Psychotherapy: Related?

I have always loved the practice of art. I can really get behind any idea related to color and creativity but getting out acrylics to spend two hours painting on a canvas just doesn’t usually find it’s way into my life these days. While painting was such a therapeutic pastime for me, with three relatively small kids, it can get a little, well, complicated. Unless of course, they paint too. Which then actually doesn’t usually mean I paint, unless the other word for painting becomes referee, or spill-catcher. The emotion my kids put into creativity is so awesome and truly passionate. But it requires my full attention, that’s all.

Needless to say, I’ve been searching for ways to bring back creativity
and color and art in a way that doesn’t require me to book a hotel stay. I came across House of Hipsters recently from a friend’s re-post and was immediately enamored by the idea of creativity and home style. Kyla posts images on HOH that make me want to sit and stare at my computer screen all day.  It isn’t my usual medium for artwork, but spending a little bit of time between the blog and Emily Henderson’s (I just got into this, yes. I realized she’s
probably been around awhile, but I’m super late to this party) book became inspiring.

Emily Henderson’s “Styled”. A read inspired by House of Hipsters.

Emily Henderson’s “Styled”. A read inspired by House of Hipsters.

When I’d thought of styling in the past, it was full of complicated and far-out ideas that didn’t really mesh with me. Until I saw this:

The Vignette.

The Vignette.

The Vignette.
The vignette allows you to take one small area of your room, not even home, but just one room, and focus just on that small space. Using a few different decor items, pictures, lamps, a piece of furniture, color, you can create a sense of peace, joy, serenity, creativity that is transformative. Huh. Sounds a little bit like psychotherapy to me.

When we become stressed out, overwhelmed, anxious and/or depressed, it’s difficult not to look at life as a whole and create a judgement about all of it. The whole thing all of a sudden sucks, not just part of it. We lose our perspective and when that happens our ability to find truth in the details becomes lost on us. When you find yourself using words like “entire,” “all,” “always,” “never,” that way over-generalize and exaggerate negative emotion, you know you’re in the thick of perspective forest, trying to weed your way through.

This is where styling and psychotherapy can fit extremely well together. When you begin to notice perspective is fading  and all of a sudden feel as though everything is crashing down at once, remember the idea of a vignette and start there. Don’t attempt to take over the entire room, or your entire life, just one small corner of it. Stand back and regain your footing, your confidence, and your task list and think smaller, not bigger, about changes you can make to one very specific location in your life. Break. It. Down. as much as you can until you’re only looking at a piece of the life you’re in, not the entire thing.

You can make the slightest change to one part of one wall in one of the rooms in your home and it will feel like it made the whole house better. Do the same for your Self.